Umpqua River Report


by OR Department of Fish & Wildlife Staff
3-4-2021
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UMPQUA RIVER, MAINSTEM:

The river is continuing to drop, but it might start creeping back up by the weekend. Fishing seems to be picking up as we are in the middle of the season now. Don’t forget to turn in hatchery winter steelhead snouts for a chance to win a gift card (see note below.)

Bass fishing is likely going to slow with cold conditions.

Trout fishing will reopen May 22.

UMPQUA RIVER, NORTH:

Access may be limited due to impacts from last summer’s wildfires. The section from Steamboat Creek to Susan Creek is closed to access by the Forest Service. Sections of Bureau of Land Management lands also are closed.

Fishing should improve with the river turning to the classic steelhead green. Remember to turn in snouts from hatchery fish for a chance to win a $50 gift card (see below).

Some of the North Umpqua and tributaries are open for trout (those above Slide Creek Dam). These areas may be tough to access during the winter months. Check the fishing regulations to see which areas are open.

Note that as of Oct 1, fishing in the fly water area is restricted to the use of a single, barbless, artificial fly.

UMPQUA RIVER, SOUTH:   

Fishing seems to be picking up on the South. March can be a great time to catch steelhead. Don’t forget to turn in snout from hatchery winter steelhead for a chance to win a gift card (see note below).

NOTE: Umpqua winter steelhead study

Anglers who catch a hatchery winter steelhead in the Umpqua Basin are being asked to turn in the snouts from those fish. Some of these snouts contain small tags. Anglers who turn in snouts that contain these tags will be entered into a raffle for a $50 gift card. Snouts may be turned in at barrels located around the basin, Sportsman’s Warehouse in Roseburg, or the Roseburg ODFW office. Tags obtained from the fish will inform ODFW on the best release strategy for juveniles to provide the most fish back to anglers in the future







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